Is teaching a team game?

19 01 2014

Goal!

To what extent is teaching a team game?

Is the teachers’ room filled with individuals?

When and how does this group of individuals become a team?

These questions, among others, came up in a recent talk given by Loraine Kennedy to the London Directors of Studies Association (Londosa). I found them interesting questions because I like to see myself as a team player, and when recruiting for teachers, I tend to look for team players. But why?

When it comes down to it, teachers in a school don’t necessarily operate as a team. The DOS allocates them a class or two and off they go, on their own…to teach. Their primary company function is inherently individual – the classroom door is closed, and for the the next hour or two, what happens is between them and their students (the employee working alone with their customers), and so long as the students leave happy, there is very little impact on anyone else.

So why were we all there at the LONDOSA meeting, 25 directors of studies, focused on gaining new insights into team work and managing teams?

Well, it is because when we are able to build a sense of teamwork, to mould our group of individual teachers into a teaching team, then we – the school, the teachers, and the DoS – can all start to achieve something greater than we could otherwise:

  • greater standards of excellence in the classroom
  • greater learner experience
  • greater individual and organisational development and learning
  • greater adaptability to change
  • greater ability to innovate
  • greater sense of harmony and morale

Is that all true? Maybe. Some teams win the Champions League, others fail and fall to the bottom of the league.

defeat

So how do we shape our group of teachers into a successful all-achieving team?

Simply put, you need to give them cause to work together.

Loraine used an analogy in her session which made me smile (because this happened to me once): “A group of people gets into a lift. A team occurs when the lift gets stuck.” A team is more than a group. They have a common goal.

One simple way to give teachers a common goal is to timetable classes with co-teachers. In other words, a three hour class is split into two sessions with teacher A and teacher B. This will inevitably lead to discussions between the co-teachers about their learners’ strengths and weaknesses, about material and task type preferences, and involve them in problem solving. You may need to prompt or facilitate this kind of liaising between co-teachers, but a co-taught class provides such a classic information gap between colleagues that they are more likely to discuss the class than not. We have always done it this way in my school, and I think it is fairly common practice – but if not, perhaps explore ways to tweak your timetable to allow for co-teachers. It is great way for new teachers to get to know new colleagues, and gradually over time it helps teachers develop a strong sense of trust – and this is a vital component of a great team.

Providing opportunities for teachers to collaborate on projects and developmental initiatives is another way of getting the team working together. The Food Issues Month in October (promoted by the IATEFL Global Issues SIG) was a perfect chance to set up a project for the team to explore a common theme, and share ideas with each other – outlined in this blog here. It resulted in two pairs of teachers team-teaching; shared resources and ideas; a video conference lesson between one of our classes in London and a class in Russia; and a good degree of experimentation and reflection.

And making this kind of project part of a common goal, part of a grander vision – to foster a culture of learning and of continuous improvement – helps raise the interaction to a higher level. Peer observations and mentoring, for example, then become more than an activity between two individuals working together but part of the team drive to keep learning and to keep improving standards.

A shared vision is important for a team and you need to be transparent about it. State it as an explicit goal in appraisals, for both you and your teachers, and then make continual reference to it in meetings and in communication face to face or by email. And then get buy-in from your team – by leading by example, by sharing successes, and by giving recognition to those who put the vision into action.

Challenging, stressful situations may test the spirit of a team, but can also be used to strengthen a team bond. Preparing for an inspection is a good example of this. Look together at what the last inspection report said, debate whether you agree, which comments are true, and which comments miss the mark; highlight what the reality is; discuss how you are going to respond, and what action you can take. The inspection becomes a team challenge – ‘we’re in this together’ – and the pride of achieving success can be something you all share in.

Finally, a great team has different characters and personalities. You have to get to know your teachers, and identify their team roles. Who are the captains in your team, who are the ones who keep morale up, and who will go that extra mile to help and support others? And, how do you fit into the team? The DOS is the leader – all teams need one – and you play the key role in setting the tone for the team. Practice what you preach. Be demanding but fair, transparent and flexible, listen, and know the capabilities of your team. And if the tone you set is right, then there will be a sense of belonging, people will want to be part of the team, and the individuals performing the individual function of teaching can become and can achieve something greater.

victory

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Launching a team project

10 10 2013
Food glorious food

Food glorious food

Cross posted at TESOL Training blog

How many times have you taught a ‘Food’ lesson? Too many times to remember, no? Lessons around topics like this, perhaps:

  • Your favourite/worst meal
  • Ingredients and cooking
  • Traditional food in your country
  • Recipes (good one this – maybe a student will come to the next lesson bearing culinary gifts!)
  • Eating manners and customs
  • Food idioms
  • Weird and wonderful dishes around the world

Food is universal to the human condition, and makes for a popular topic, for teachers and students alike. But how often have you taught a lesson about one of the big issues surrounding food? Issues such as food scarcity, food waste, hunger, or obesity, for example?

This is a question posed by the IATEFL Global Issues Special Interest Group (GISIG), who are inviting teachers during the month of October to contribute and share ideas on how ‘we can teach “food” with a conscience’.

GISIGThis month-long event will be co-ordinated online via the GISIG website and a special Facebook event page.

When I heard about this event, it immediately caught my attention. For me, as a Director of Studies, I could see the potential for it to work as a school project, a ‘theme’ to really stimulate student engagement on the one hand, and teacher development on the other, and so it ticks a lot of boxes.

For our students, being in central London is one of the key ingredients (sorry, no pun intended!) to their course with us, and we have a great social programme which helps them to make the most of their time in this amazing city. And we have an excellent team of teachers who are, I think, incredibly creative and engaging, and they regularly challenge their learners to reflect on big global issues – but in their own individual lessons. This Food Issues project gives us a cohesive ‘theme’ for a month, and with it the opportunity for teachers of different classes and courses to do things together – it would be interesting for example to get Business English students interviewing a group of General English students, and then putting together a business-style presentation of what they found out – and vice versa.

For our teachers, we offer a lot of different things to promote and stimulate ongoing professional development, such as our internal & external workshop sessions  but I am particularly interested in collaborative learning: teachers trying out new ideas in their teaching, and sharing ideas with colleagues – and tapping into personal interests.  The GISIG Food Issues month clearly lends itself to experimenting with new topics, creating new materials and trying out new activities, and I have a feeling that most teachers will be engaged by the many possible food issues which could be explored, and will want to share their ideas with each other. I am also really interested to see to what extent our teachers will interact with the online event, and share ideas with teachers around the world.

So, last Thursday, I attempted to launch this as a team project for our school.

As part of our staff meeting, I asked everyone to look at two images and discuss their reactions to them:

BigMac1

BigMac2

 

[Images credit: Adbusters]

There was interest, much comment, and it was easy to elicit Food as the underlying theme, and what the potential related issues were.

I then introduced everyone to the GISIG project idea, and we discussed how we could get involved as a school.  Some initial suggestions were made, and overall I was really happy with the response.

I followed up the meeting with an email giving everyone the GISIG links, a reminder of the suggested Food Issues, and some initial ideas for how to explore them in class, as follows:

Is there a topic which catches your attention? Which might engage your students? How could you explore it with them?

A reading followed by a debate

Design some spoof ads of your own

Create a survey to ask other students? To ask Londoners? To interview students elsewhere?

Presentations of a solution to a problem

Design a poster

Create a digital poster? (www.glogster.com )

Film a news report summarizing an article

Put together a class magazine

Create a radio programme

Of course I know that suggesting something in a meeting and an email will not necessarily get buy-in from everyone. And I will not oblige any teacher to teach Food Issues lessons – a ‘command and control’ approach never works effectively when it comes to collaborative learning. But the idea has been ‘launched’. The seed has been planted. I will try to facilitate now – nudge, prompt, suggest – and will try to keep the idea bubbling away and see if it takes off.

I am excited to see how much we can get involved as a team, and a school, and what we can all learn from the project.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Does the DOS do it for you?

5 02 2013

Stop! Right there.

This is not a post about staff-room titillation. (Sorry!)

No, this is about a different kind of pull – that of motivation and inspiration.

Because, whether you like it or not, when you become a DOS, you become a leader (don’t you?), and one of the jobs of a leader is to motivate and inspire others.

Carrots

Carrots

In ELT this is inevitably a pretty tricky thing to do. You’re up against it from the off.

Firstly, before becoming the DOS, you were probably ‘just’ a teacher. Used to inspiring your students on a daily basis, of course!…but your colleagues, your peers? – that’s a different matter.

And since becoming DOS, you’ve probably had little or no ‘leadership‘ training. In Jenny Johnson’s 2009 survey of ELT Managers & Management Training, it was found that in fact a majority of the 135 respondents had received some kind of pre-service training: “…36% had had a handover period, 33% had had a mentor, 17% had done a management training course and 13% had attended sessions or workshops. However, 35% had not had any training before they started [the role].” I had a 4 week handover period but spent most of that time getting to grips with the nuts and bolts of the job, like planning and timetabling, and ordering books! I don’t recall covering the bit about ‘how to become an inspirational leader’ in that time!

And secondly, what about the people you have to motivate and inspire? Many are in the game for a multitude of reasons:

  • A vocational desire to help students learn to communicate in English? – yes, probably 😉
  • Keeping the wolf from the door while other pursuits are pursued (acting, music, writing, film-making, studying)? – also a fair bet. (If our teachers’ true vocational dreams lie elsewhere, can we really motivate and inspire them?)
  • Money? In ELT? No, let’s face it – money isn’t one of them.
  • And nor is promotion – where is the career ladder in ELT I hear you scream?! (there is one by the way, it’s just not very well defined). But anyway, who has ever been inspired by money or promotion?!

So, it can be a tough one.

I thought it would be interesting to see what inspired other people, and I was chatting with some non-ELT friends the other day, and asked what it was that inspired them in their jobs and how they inspired others. The lawyer said that for him and his team, they simply had to realise they were offering a professional service which was highly paid for by their clients and that should be enough to motivate them; the PR exec said it was ‘more about do than say’; the Social Worker said the NHS was also a service but there wasn’t any boss who inspired her, it all came down to her own self-motivation to help others; the Merchandiser said it was her company’s values which inspired her (the Number One Value being the ‘happiness of the employees’!); and the Fashion designer said it was all about the character of her boss – ‘she is amazing, brilliant strategic insight and decisiveness. I want to be like her!’

My friends’ comments seem to chime with those expressed by the ELT practitioners who took part in a recent #ELTchat on Motivating Teachers, summarised here. Namely, that we can be motivated (and de-motivated) by many different things.

So, back to my role as DOS and what I can do, because I definitely have a part to play. Here are some thoughts on motivating and inspiring my team*:

Deal with what Herzberg calls the ‘hygiene factors’:

  • Pay – we’re a long way off from being on a par with the highest earners in society, but fight for competitive pay for your teachers
  • Security – keep a tight ship and make sure everyone has enough work
  • Conditions – do your best to keep the facilities comfortable and provide the right tools for the job
  • Keep the admin to a minimum, and try to ensure it can be simply and efficiently done
  • Get out of the way – avoid prescriptive measures and let the teachers get on with expressing their individual teaching flair
  • Morale – know your teachers, listen to them, build up a good rapport, go out for a drink with them, be happy to make a fool of yourself  (get on the mic at the summer karaoke party 🙂 )

And then focus on the ‘motivating factors’

  • Vary the work by giving teachers different kinds of courses to teach
  • Challenge them with new levels, new courses
  • Give teachers autonomy – create space within the syllabus for choice of materials and resources, for creativity
  • Recognise and ‘reward’ those who go the extra mile
  • And provide plenty of opportunities for growth – a framework and conditions for professional development which I have described here and here

Cake

And then the inspirational icing on the cake

  • Practice what you preach – one of my goals is to create and maintain a learning culture at the school, and one way I promote this is by regularly sharing my learning with the team
  • Create a shared vision – whatever the goals are for the school, for the team, for each individual teacher, find ways to build a sense of engagement in that vision
  • Know your stuff – read, tweet, blog, attend webinars & conferences, and keep up with the latest thinking
  • Be innovative – use the latest tech tools in your meetings, or workshops, and once again be a model for others
  • Set compelling goals – tap into the the deep seated desire of all teachers (even those whose dreams lie elsewhere) to do their best to contribute to their learners’ ongoing progress and achievement
  • Be inspired – find what it is that inspires you, and you’ll find it easier to inspire others…

So, if you are a teacher reading this, what do you think? Does your DOS do it for you? What is it about them that inspires you?

And if you are a DOS, stop for a moment; take a deep breath; shut your eyes and with your tongue firmly in your cheek, allow yourself to dream that this song is for you.

The famous song about Directors of Studies: ‘Nobody DOS it better‘ 😉

*disclaimer: this is what I attempt to achieve..but do I? – hey, you gotta try!





What to put in the CPD pot?

21 01 2013
Photo by @purple_steph #eltpics

Photo by @purple_steph #eltpics

As well as everything else, the start of the year also means working on and kicking off a new programme of teacher development sessions.

What elements should a good programme include? Here are some thoughts:

collaboration and interaction / workshops

peer support and inclusiveness / swapshops

shared knowledge and experience / insets and peer observations

relevant input and practical outcomes / instantly useable ideas

outside expertise / invited speakers

challenge for the participants

challenge for the trainers

enquiry, research, reflection

choice of topics and consultation

non-compulsory attendance, but incentive

As mentioned here, I believe in self directed professional development, but as the DOS I need to provide a framework and the conditions for people to develop within, for people to find their own way. At my school, I’d like to say that we are building a learning culture – I think we can always keep developing, and I think that somehow teachers who are learning make better teachers, but more on that in a future post…

So I was thinking about what topics and themes to include in this year’s TD programme, and I thought I’d look back to recap on what we did in 2012.

TD sessions in 2012

  • Putting Reflection into Practice
  • Exploiting and extending materials – with Speak Out author, Antonia Clare
  • Demanding more in Conversation classes
  • IATEFL Report – feedback from 4 colleagues (2 who presented, 2 who attended the conference)
  • Lesson plans and resources Swapshop 1
  • The 3 Rs – Review, Reformulate, Recycle
  • Teaching Unplugged  – with co-author, Luke Meddings
  • Making the most of the coursebook
  • Teaching unplugged in practice
  • Lesson plans and resources Swapshop 2
  • Business English for the uninitiated
  • On the tip of your tongue – pronunciation workshop
  • Using the iPad
  • Using the Flipcam
  • Using the Speak Out Activebook
  • Attending to students with special learner needs
  • Methodology: Putting theory into practice
  • The board: a teacher’s best friend
  • Demand High 1
  • Demand High 2
  • Business English for the initiated

After finishing this list, I thought – hmm, that looks pretty impressive!

But momentarily I wonder – what did it all add up to? what did it achieve? are the teachers teaching better lessons? are the students making better progress? are we achieving a culture of learning?

On balance, I have to believe that we are; better to have these sessions, these opportunities, than not to have any at all. And then the rest should follow.

So, back to 2013…what ingredients to throw in the pot for this year?

What’s going into your CPD pot?

Photo by @ij64 #eltpics

Photo by @ij64 #eltpics